Keeping Costs Down

COVID-19 has put a tremendous strain on our local businesses, not-for-profits and nonprofits. On this page, we have outlined supports available. 



 

⚠ Ontario moved to its next phase of reopening on March 1, 2022. While the proof of vaccination is now no longer required for most indoor settings, businesses and other settings may choose to continue to require proof of vaccination. Ottawa Public Health will continue to share information to help you make informed decisions regarding activities and personal levels of risk in this changing environment.

⚠ With Ontario entering the Roadmap Exit Step under the Reopening Ontario Act, OPH has revoked its COVID-19 self-isolation section 22 class order as of March 1st. Please continue to follow provincial guidelines for isolation for those who have symptoms, test positive for COVID-19 or high-risk contacts.

 


Low-Income Workers Tax Credit (LIFT)

  • Provides up to $850 each year in Ontario personal income tax relief to low-income workers, and can be used to reduce or eliminate an individual’s Ontario personal income tax, excluding the Ontario Health Premium
    • your individual adjusted net income for the year must be below $38,500
    • your adjusted family net income for the year must be below $68,500
  • Example

A single person who works full time at minimum wage (earning nearly $30,000) with no other income will:

  • receive $850 in tax relief
  • pay no Ontario personal income tax

Seniors Home Safety Tax Credit

Helps make seniors’ homes safer and more accessible so they can stay in their homes longer.

The Seniors’ Home Safety Tax Credit is a temporary, refundable personal income tax credit that can help you make your home safer and more accessible, helping you stay in your home longer.

The credit is available for the 2021 and 2022 tax years and is worth 25% of up to $10,000 in eligible expenses per year for a senior’s principal residence in Ontario.

Expenses must be paid or payable in 2021 and 2022. The maximum credit is $2,500 per year.

• The credit is worth 25 per cent of up to $10,000 in eligible expenses for a senior’s principal residence in Ontario, to a maximum credit of $2,500
• The government is also extending this tax credit to the 2022 tax year, to help seniors who may not have had a chance to use it in 2021


Ontario Jobs Training Tax Credit

Helps workers get training that may be needed for a career shift, re-training or to sharpen their skills

  • The credit provides up to $2,000 in relief for 50 per cent of a person’s eligible expense
  • The government is extending this tax credit to the 2022 tax year, to help more workers continue to upgrade their skills and transition back to the labour force

To claim the credit for 2021 or 2022, you must:

  • have a positive Canada Training Credit limit for that year
  • be an Ontario resident on December 31 of that year
  • be aged 26 to 65 years old at the end of that year, and
  • meet the other requirements set out in the federal Income Tax Act for at least one of 2019, 2020 or 2021

Ontario Childcare Tax Credit (CARE)

Puts more money in the pockets of families and provides the flexibility they need to choose the child care options that work best for them.

The Ontario Child Care Tax Credit (known as Ontario Childcare Access and Relief from Expenses (CARE) Tax Credit) puts more money in the pockets of families and provides the flexibility they need to choose the child care options that work best for them.

  • Eligible families can claim up to 75% of their eligible child care expenses, including services provided by child care centres, homes and camps
  • As announced in the 2021 Ontario Budget, the government will provide an automatic top‑up of 20 per cent of the credit entitlement for the 2021 taxation year
  • The Ontario Child Care Tax Credit supports families with incomes up to $150,000, particularly those with low and moderate incomes
  • The government provided a 20 per cent top‐up to this tax credit for 2021, increasing support from $1,250 to $1,500, on average

You can claim this tax credit when you file your personal income tax return.


Staycation Tax Credit

Encourages Ontario families to explore the province, helping the tourism and hospitality sectors recover from the COVID-19 pandemic and make life more affordable for people and families.

  • It allows Ontario residents to claim 20 per cent of their eligible 2022 accommodation expenses (for example, for a stay at an eligible hotel, cottage or campground) of up to $1,000 as an individual or $2,000 if you have a spouse, common-law partner or eligible children, to get back up to $200 as an individual or $400 as a family.

The temporary Ontario Staycation Tax Credit for 2022 aims to encourage Ontario families to explore the province, while helping the tourism and hospitality sectors recover from the financial impacts of the COVID‑19 pandemic.

Ontario residents can claim 20% of their eligible 2022 accommodation expenses, for example, for a stay at a hotel, cottage or campground, when filing their personal Income Tax and Benefit Return for 2022. You can claim eligible expenses of up to $1,000 as an individual or $2,000 if you have a spouse, common-law partner or eligible children, to get back up to $200 as an individual or $400 as a family.

The credit will provide an estimated $270 million in support to about 1.85 million Ontario families.

Who is eligible: You are eligible to claim the credit if you are an Ontario resident on December 31, 2022.

Only one individual per family can claim the credit for the year. Your claim can include the eligible expenses of your spouse or common-law partner and your eligible children. An eligible child is not entitled to claim the credit.

If you do not have a spouse or common-law partner, or eligible child, you can claim your own eligible expenses for the credit.


Minimum Wage Increase

Minimum wage rates in Ontario will increase on October 1, 2022. This increase is tied to the Ontario Consumer Price Index for 2022.

The increase to the general minimum wage will be 50 cents, which will bring the new rate to $15.50 an hour.

Compliance with the minimum wage requirements is determined on a pay period basis. As the cost of living continues to go up, our government is proud to be working for workers, putting more money into their pockets by increasing the minimum wage.

  • Increase to $15/hr impacted more than 760,000 workers
  • Liquor servers treated more fairly and see an unprecedented 19.5 per cent increase in their minimum hourly wage, as it changes from $12.55 per hour to the harmonized $15 per hour minimum wage

Removed License Plate Renewal Fees

Making life more affordable and convenient for nearly eight million vehicle owners by eliminating licence plate renewal fees and the requirement to have a licence plate sticker for passenger vehicles, light-duty trucks, motorcycles and mopeds, effective March 13, 2022.

Cutting costs for millions of Ontario vehicle owners by refunding licence plate sticker renewal fees paid since March 2020.

  • Physical licence plate stickers have been eliminated in other jurisdictions in Canada including Quebec, Saskatchewan, Northwest Territories, Manitoba and Alberta.
  • Drivers must continue to renew their driver’s licence every five years online or at a ServiceOntario centre and pay a $90 fee.
  • ALPR is tested technology already being used by a number of Ontario police services.

Example: Vehicle owners save $120 per year.


Gas Tax

A bill to implement the tax reduction (“Tax Relief at the Pumps Act, 2022” ) was introduced on April 4, 2022. 

Keep costs down for Ontario families and businesses. Effective from July 1, 2022 to December 31, 2022.

Gasoline tax rate would be reduced from14.7 cents per litre to 9 cents per litre

Fuel (diesel) tax rate would be reduced from 14.3  cents per litre to 9   cents per litre

Ontario’s plan to cut gas and fuel taxes is part of a broader package that will provide immediate cost-of-living relief, including:

  • Cutting costs for millions of Ontario vehicle owners by refunding licence plate sticker renewal fees paid since March 2020, and eliminating licence plate renewal fees and plate stickers on a go-forward basis, saving vehicle owners $120 a year in southern Ontario and $60 a year in Northern Ontario for passenger and light commercial vehicles.
  • Permanently removing tolls on Highways 412 and 418, effective April 5.
  • Providing tax relief for workers, families and seniors through the Low-Income Workers Tax Credit, the Seniors’ Home Safety Tax Credit, the Ontario Jobs Training Tax Credit and the Ontario Child Care Tax Credit.
  • Reaching an agreement with the federal government for $13.2 billion of funding for a Canada-wide Early Learning and Child Care System, providing Ontario families with children five years old and younger in participating licensed child care centres with up to 25 per cent in savings, to a minimum of $12 per day, retroactive to April 1, 2022. This agreement will deliver an average of $10-a-day child care for eligible children by September 2025.